STATE-BY-STATE GUIDE OF MEDICAL RECORD COPYING FEES - MIDWEST

THE MIDWEST REGION

 

REGIONAL HEALTHCARE INFORMATION NEWS: A study from 2008 out of Southern Illinois University explored the impact of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) on rural Midwest ethics committees. It found that smaller facilities were more likely to have a HIPAA Officer on the committee and that those committees with HIPAA Officers were more likely to be involved in the monitoring and remediation of HIPAA violations. This early study showed that HIPAA was, indeed, changing the conversation surrounding ethics in healthcare administration. A 2016 HIPAA survey confirms that progress continues, although slowly - the survey shows a 2% increase since 2014 in respondents who are confident that there’s someone within their practice familiar with HIPAA who is actively ensuring compliance. More promisingly, an additional 12% have put a compliance plan into action within the same period of time.

 

When practices take the time to improve their HIPAA compliance, they make a commitment to improving their standards of patient care and to being the kind of practice that can be trusted to make informed, ethical decisions.

 

Illinois

      Search Fee

      $26.58

      Pages 1 - 25

      $1.00 per page

      Pages 26 - 50

      $0.66 per page

      Pages 50+

      $0.33 per page

      Microfilm or other media

      $1.66 per page

      Postage

      Actual cost of mailing

State of Illinois (IL) Medical Record Fees

Illinois Compiled Statutes (Statute 735 ILCS 5/8-2006)

 

Indiana

      Pages 1-10

      $20.00 flat fee

      Pages 11 -  50

      $0.50 per page

      Pages 51+

      0.25 per page

      Microfilm and other media

      $1.25 per page

      Rush Fee

      Additional $10 if request is completed / sent within 2 days

State of Indiana (IN) Medical Record Fees

Medical Licensing Board of Indiana (Statute 760 IAC 1-71-3(a))

 

Iowa

      A reasonable fee may be charged.

State of Iowa (IA) Medical Record Fees

Iowa Code 2016 (Statute 760 IAC 1-7-71-3)

 

Kansas

      A "cost based fee" may be charged.

State of Kansas (KS) Medical Record Fees

Department of Health and Human Services (K.S.A. 65-4971(b))

 

      Worker's Comp

      Pages 1 - 10

      $16.00 flat fee

      Pages 11 - 50

      $12.00 flat fee

      Pages 50+

      $0.35 per page

Division of Worker's Compensation Fee Schedule 2012

 

Michigan

      Search Fee

      $23.62

      Pages 1 - 20

      $1.18 per page

      Pages 21 - 50

      $0.59 per page

      Pages 51+

      $0.24 per page

      NOTE: "A 'patient', as defined by this rule, shall not be charged the initial fee for the patient's own medical record. However, a patient can be charged the other permitted fees (e.g. the per page fees)."

State of Michigan (MI) Medical Record Fees

Michigan Legislature (Public Act 47 of 2004. MCL 333.26269)

 

Minnesota

      Search Fee

      $17.79

      Pages 1+

      $1.34 per page

      X-rays

      $10 Search Fee plus the actual per page cost of reproduction

      Postage

      Actual cost of mailing

      Worker's Comp

      Records Requested For Dates of Injury Only

      Pages 1+

      $0.75 per page

      Records Requested For Dates Prior To / Outside of Injury

      Search Fee

      $10.00

      Pages 1+

      $0.75 per page

State of Minnesota (MN) Medical Record Fees

Minnesota Administrative Rules (Rule 5219.0300)

 

Missouri

      Paper Records

      Search Fee

      $23.94

      Pages 1+

      $0.55 per page

      Storage Fee

      $22.41 (if records are retrieved from an off-site location)

      Electronic Records

      Search Fee

      $23.94

      Pages 1+

      $0.55 per page

      Maximum fee

      $104.91 (for electronic records, you must charge a flat $104.91 fee if the total cost of record copies exceeds the per page fee listed above.)

State of Missouri (MO) Medical Record Fees

Missouri Department of Health & Senior Services (Section 191.227.5)

 

Nebraska

      Search Fee

      $20.00

      Pages 1+

      0.50 per page

      X-rays and other media

      Actual cost of reproduction

State of Nebraska (NE) Medical Record Fees

Nebraska Legislature (Statute 71-8404)

 

North Dakota

      Paper Records

      Pages 1 - 25

      $20 Flat Fee

      Pages 26+

      $0.75 per page

      Electronic Records

      Pages 1 - 25

      $30 Flat Fee

      Pages 26+

      $0.25 per page

State of North Dakota (ND) Medical Record Fees

Sixty-second Legislative Assembly of North Dakota (ND Cent Code Section 23-12-14)

 

Ohio

      Patient or Patient's Personal Representative

      Pages 1 - 10

      $3.07 flat fee

      Pages 11 - 50

      $0.64 per page

      Pages 51+

      $0.26 per page

      X-rays, MRI, CAT scan (recorded on paper or film)

      $2.10 per page

      Postage

      Actual cost of mailing

      All other requestors

      Search Fee

      $18.91

      Pages 1 - 10

      $1.24 per page

      Pages 11 - 50

      $0.64 per page

      Pages 51+

      $0.26 per page

      X-rays, MRI, CAT Scan (recorded on paper or film)

      $2.10 per page

State of Ohio (OH) Medical Record Fees

Ohio Revised Code (Section 3701.742)

 

South Dakota

      No current laws for copying medical records on record in this state.

State of South Dakota (SD) Medical Record Fees

 

Wisconsin

      Paper Records

      Search Fee (Only for requesters that are NOT patient or patient's personal representative)

      $20.96

      Pages 1 - 25

      $1.06 per page

      Pages 26 - 50

      $0.78 per page

      Pages 51 - 100

      $0.53 per page

      Pages 101+

      $0.31 per page

      Microfilm and other media

      $1.50 per page

      X-rays

      $10 per image

      Certification (if request is NOT patient or patient's personal representative)

      $8.00 per request

      Postage

      Actual cost of mailing

 

      Worker's Comp

      Pages 1 - 16

      $7.50 flat fee

      Pages 17+

      $0.45 per page

      Certification

      No charge

State of Wisconsin (WI) Medical Record Fees

Wisconsin State Legislature (Wis Stat 146.83 and Wis WC 102.13(2)(b))

 

 

 

OTHER REGIONS

 

NORTHEAST

WESTERN

SOUTH

 

 

 

Connecticut (CT)

Alaska (AK)

Alabama (AL)

Maine (ME)

Arizona (AZ)

Arkansas (AR)

Massachusetts (MA)

California (CA)

Delaware (DE)

New Hampshire (NH)

Colorado (CO)

District of Columbia (DC)

New Jersey (NJ)

Hawaii (HI)

Florida (FL)

New York (NY)

Idaho (ID)

Georgia (GA)

Pennsylvania (PA)

Montana (MT)

Kentucky (KY)

Rhode Island (RI)

Nevada (NV)

Louisiana (LA)

Vermont (VT)

New Mexico (NM)

Maryland (MD)

Oregon (OR)

Mississippi (MS)

Utah (UT)

North Carolina (NC)

Washington (WA)

Oklahoma (OK)

Wyoming (WY)

South Carolina (SC)

Tennessee (TN)

Texas (TX)

Virginia (VA)

West Virginia (WV)

STATE-BY-STATE GUIDE OF MEDICAL RECORD COPYING FEES - WEST

THE WESTERN REGION

REGIONAL HEALTHCARE INFORMATION NEWS: In March of 2016, California’s Health Information Association (CHIA) received the results from their Environmental Scan and Member Survey. It was sent to all Health Information Management (HIM) professionals in December, 2015, and involved questions pertaining to the truthfulness of various trends and the importance of those trends as far as the impact they might have on practices in the coming years. The trend that was most agreed with regarded how technology is changing how people perform their jobs and how workplaces must utilize this technology to help their employees succeed - this concept garnered a 99.1% agreement rating. The trend that was least agreed with was that young professionals valued the professional network that association membership offered them (52.94% agreed), indicating that the association may need to reevaluate what they can offer to younger professionals to maintain relevance in a quickly changing, dynamic field. CHIA will be looking to use these findings to formulate impactful strategies in the coming years. More information and further survey responses can be found here.

 

Alaska Medical Record Fee Schedule

      No current laws for copying medical records on record in this state.

State of Alaska (AK) Medical Record Fees

 

 

Arizona Medical Record Fee Schedule

      A reasonable fee may be charged.

 

State of Arizona (AZ) Medical Record Fees

Arizona Legislature (Statute 12-2295)

 

California Medical Record Fee Schedule

      Pages 1+

      $0.25 per page

      Microfilm

      $0.50 per page

      X-rays

      Actual cost of reproduction

State of California (CA) Medical Record Fees

California Health and Safety Code (Section 123110(b))

 

Colorado Medical Record Fee Schedule

      Search Fee

      First 10 pages or fewer

      $18.53 flat fee

      Pages 11 - 40

      $0.85 per page

      Pages 41+

      $0.57 per page

      Postage

      Actual cost of mailing

      Microfilm

      $1.50 per page

State of Colorado (CO) Medical Record Fees

Second Regular Session of Sixty-ninth General Assembly of the State of Colorado (House Bill 14-1186)

 

Hawaii Medical Record Fee Schedule

      A reasonable fee may be charged.

State of Hawaii (HI) Medical Record Fees

Hawaii Office of Information Practices (Revised Statute Section 622-57(g))

 

Idaho Medical Record Fee Schedule

      No current laws for copying medical records on record in this state.

State of Idaho (ID) Medical Record Fees

 

 

Montana Medical Record Fee Schedule

      Search Fee

      $15.00

      Pages 1+

      $0.50 per page

State of Montana (MT) Medical Record Fees

Montana Code Annotated 2015 (50-16-540)

 

Nevada Medical Record Fee Schedule

      Pages 1+

      $0.60 per page

      X-rays and other media

      Reasonable fees may be charged.

State of Nevada (NV) Medical Record Fees

Nevada State Legislature (NRS 629.061)

 

New Mexico Medical Record Fee Schedule

      Pages 1 - 15

      $30.00 Flat Fee

      Pages 16+

      $0.25 per page

      X-rays and other media

      Actual cost of reproduction

State of New Mexico (NM) Medical Record Fees

New Mexico Medical Board (Statute 16.10.17.8)

 

Oregon Medical Record Fee Schedule

      Pages 1 - 10

      $30.00 Flat Fee

      Pages 11 - 50

      $0.50 per page

      Pages 51+ : $0.25 per page

      Bonus Fee : $5.00 if records are processed and sent within 7 business days from date of request

      X-rays and other media : Actual cost of reproduction

      Postage : Actual cost of mailing

State of Oregon (OR) Medical Record Fees

2007 Oregon Revised Statutes (Statute ORS 192.521)

 

Utah Medical Record Fee Schedule

      Paper Records

      Search Fee

      $15.00

      Pages 1+

      $0.50 per page

      Electronic Records

      Search Fee

      $25.00 per request

State of Utah (UT) Medical Record Fees

Utah State Legislature (Title 26-1-37 Amendment H.B. 212)

 

Washington Medical Record Fee Schedule

      Search Fee

      $25.00

      Pages 1 - 30

      $1.12 per page

      Pages 31+

      $0.84 per page

State of Washington (WA) Medical Record Fees

Washington Administrative Code (246-08-400)

 

Wyoming Medical Record Fee Schedule

      A reasonable fee may be charged reflecting actual cost to produce records.

State of Wyoming (WY) Medical Record Fees

2013 Wyoming Statutes (Title 35, Chapter 2, Article 6, Section 35-2-611(b))

 

 

OTHER REGIONS

 

NORTHEAST

MIDWEST

SOUTH

 

 

 

Connecticut (CT)

Illinois (IL)     

Alabama (AL)

Maine (ME)

Indiana (IN)

Arkansas (AR)

Massachusetts (MA)

Iowa (IA)

Delaware (DE)

New Hampshire (NH)

Kansas (KS)

District of Columbia (DC)

New Jersey (NJ)

Michigan (MI)

Florida (FL)

New York (NY)

Minnesota (MN)

Georgia (GA)

Pennsylvania (PA)

Missouri (MO)

Kentucky (KY)

Rhode Island (RI)

Nebraska (NE)

Louisiana (LA)

Vermont (VT)

North Dakota (ND)

Ohio (OH)

Maryland (MD)

Mississippi (MS)

South Dakota (SD)

Wisconsin (WI)

North Carolina (NC)

Oklahoma (OK)

South Carolina (SC)

Tennessee (TN)

Texas (TX)

Virginia (VA)

West Virginia (WV)

Expanding Healthcare Information Access for Patients

Expanding Healthcare Information Access for Patients

In March, the Office for Civil Rights (OCR) released a document detailing individuals’ rights to access their health information under HIPAA.  It’s been shown that individuals who are more engaged with their health care are able to achieve better health outcomes at a lower cost and having access to health information increases engagement, enabling individuals to make more informed treatment decisions, adopt healthy behaviors, and take medication as advised.

The HIPAA Privacy Rule allows individuals to get a copy of their health information from most covered entities and establishes minimum standards for the processes involved, including access provided, the denial of access, and documentation of actions. This rule and the 2009 Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (HITECH) specify that covered entities must provide a copy of PHI within thirty days of a request, provide it in the format requested (if it is readily available), and may not charge individuals more than a reasonable, cost-based fee. If electronic health record technology has been adopted by the entity, they must provide access to the information in electronic format. If an individual wishes, they may designate a person or entity to receive a copy of their records.

Despite the progress that these efforts and others have made towards giving patients quick, easy access to their health information, some barriers remain. For example, many individuals are unaware of their legal right to ask for a copy of their health information from their providers and to elect a personal representative to receive this information if they choose. Additionally, some health care providers do not store health information in electronic form, and patients must wait until physical copies are made and mailed to them, which can slow down access. To help remove these barriers, there are many steps entities can take.

Recognize and make patients aware that authorization is not required for access to their own PHI

To be HIPAA-compliant, entities must require authorization when a third party requests access to a patient’s PHI. However, it’s important to note that authorization is not required for individuals or their designated representative. Patients can simply submit a request in writing to the healthcare provider in order to receive the PHI. This request may be required to be in a specific format (such as a form specified by the entity) but this format must not limit accessibility.

Honor requests from personal representatives requesting PHI

If an individual has designated another person or entity to receive their healthcare information (healthcare power of attorneys or parent/guardians of minors, for example), this representative has the same right to access the patient’s PHI as the patient. Once the entity has ensured that the representative's authority to act on behalf of the patient is valid, they must provide the PHI in the same manner and under the same rules as if they were dealing with the individual directly.

Ensure timeliness when providing access

As stated above, entities must provide access to PHI within thirty days of a request. However, this is an outer limit of what is considered compliant, and it’s advantageous to respond as soon as possible. With the advent of electronic records, entities may be able to provide very prompt, if not immediate, access to their information. In addition, while no criteria has been established regarding how easy it is for individuals to understand the information within their health records, ensuring that the information is readable and simple to comprehend is the best path to increasing patient engagement with their health care.

STATE-BY-STATE GUIDE OF MEDICAL RECORD COPYING FEES - SOUTHEAST

THE SOUTHERN REGION

 

REGIONAL HEALTHCARE INFORMATION NEWS: In the Southern region, the Louisiana Health Information Management Association recently linked to a series of videos regarding cybersecurity and its place in healthcare systems. The videos address cybersecurity terminology, the agents of attacks and who they specifically target, the business challenges associated with maintaining cybersecurity in healthcare and, lastly, the plan to be put in place to ensure the protection of patient documents from vulnerabilities. This plan is outlined clearly in three steps: 1) improve existing systems, 2) refine web filtering and inbound email traffic, and 3) create incident response procedures in the case of an attack. More information can be found on cybersecurity and healthcare here.

 

 

Alabama Medical Record Fee Schedule

      Search Fee

      $5.00

      Pages 1 - 25

      $1.00 per page

      Pages 26+

      $0.50 per page

      X-rays / Other Media

      Actual cost of reproduction

      Postage

      Actual cost of mailing

 
State of Alabama (AL) Medical Record Fees

Alabama Code Reproduction (Section 12-21-6.1)

 

Arkansas Medical Record Fee Schedule

      Search Fee

      $15.00

      Pages 1 - 25

      $0.50

      Pages 26+

      $0.25

      Postage

      Actual cost of mailing

      Storage Fee

      A reasonable fee may be charged if records are stored off-site.

State of Arkansas (AR) Medical Record Fees       

Arkansas Code (Section 16-46-106)

 

Delaware Medical Record Fee Schedule

      Paper or Electronic Records

      Page 1 - 10

      $2.00 per page

      Pages 11 - 20

      $1.00 per page

      Pages 21 - 60

      $0.90 per page

      Pages 61+

      $0.50 per page

      Microfilm and other media

      Actual cost of reproduction

State of Delaware (DE) Medical Record Fees

Delaware Administrative Code (Title 24: 24 Del Code, Chapter 1700, Section 16)

 

      Worker's Comp

      Search Fee

      $25.00

      Pages 1 - 20

      $1.25 per page

      Pages 21 - 60

      $0.90 per page

      Pages 61+

      $0.30 per page

Delaware Administrative Code (Title 19: 19 Del Code, Chapter 1300, Section 4)

 

District of Columbia Medical Record Fee Schedule

      A reasonable fee may be charged.

District of Columbia (D.C) Medical Record Fees

D.C. Municipal Regulations and D.C. Register (Title 17, Chapter 46, Section 12)

 

Florida Medical Record Fee Schedule

      Search Fee

      $1.00 (per year per request)

      Pages 1+

      $1.00 per page

      Microfilm

      $2.00 per page

State of Florida (FL) Medical Record Fees        

2011 Florida Statutes (Statute 395.3025 (1))

 

      Worker's Comp

      Pages 1+

      $0.50 per page

Florida Administrative Code & Florida Administrative Register (69L-7.601)

 

Georgia Medical Record Fee Schedule

      Search Fee

      $25.88

      Pages 1 - 20

      $0.97 per page

      Pages 21 - 100

      $ 0.83 per page

      Pages 101+

      $0.66 per page

      Certification Fee

      $9.70

O.C.G.A. 31-33-3

 

      Worker’s Comp

      Page 1 - 150

      $30.00 flat fee

      Pages 151+

      $0.20 per page

      X-rays

      $9.50 per copy

State of Georgia (GA) Medical Record Fees

Georgia State Statute Medical Record Fees (Page 15 Section IV)

 

Kentucky Medical Record Fee Schedule

      First copy of records

      Free

      Second copy of records requested by the same patient

      $1.00 per page

Statute KRS 422.317

 

      Worker's Comp

      Pages 1+

      $0.50 per page

State of Kentucky (KY) Medical Record Fees

Kentucky Legislature (803 KAR 25:160)

 

Louisiana Medical Record Fee Schedule

      Paper & Microfilm Records

      Search Fee

      $25.00

      Pages 1 - 25

      $1.00 per page

      Pages 26 - 350

      $0.50 per page

      Pages 351+

      $0.25 per page

      Postage

      Actual cost of mailing

      Electronic Records

      Search Fee

      $ 25.00

      Pages 1 - 25

      $1.00 per page

      Pages 26 - 350

      $0.50 per page

      Pages 351+

      $0.25 per page

      Certification Fee

      No charge

 

      Worker's Comp

      First Request

      Free

      Second Request

      $0.50 per page

State of Louisiana (LA) Medical Record Fees

Louisiana State Legislature (RS 40:1165.1)

 

Maryland Medical Record Fee Schedule

      Search Fee

      $22.88

      Pages 1+

      $0.76 per page

      Postage

      Actual cost of mailing

State of Maryland (MD) Medical Record Fees

General Assembly of Maryland (Statute 4-304)

 

Mississippi Medical Record Fee Schedule

      First 20 pages

      $20.00 Flat Fee

      Pages 21 - 80

      $1.00 per page

      Pages 81+

      $0.50 pre page

      Storage Fee

      $15.00 (only charged if records are retrieved from an off-site location)

      Postage

      10% of the total charge for records

      X-rays

      Actual costs of reproduction

      Certification Fee

      $25.00

State of Mississippi (MS) Medical Record Fees

Mississippi Code of 1972 (Section 11-1-52)

 

North Carolina Medical Record Fee Schedule

      Pages 1 - 25

      $0.75 per page

      Pages 26 - 100

      $0.50 per page

      Pages 100+

      $0.25 per page

      Minimum charge

      $10.00

State of North Carolina (NC) Medical Record Fees

North Carolina General Assembly (Statute 90-411)

 

Oklahoma Medical Record Fee Schedule

      Paper Records

      Search Fee

      $10.00

      Pages 1+

      $0.50 per page

      X-rays, imaging and other media

      $5.00 per page

      Postage

      Actual cost of mailing

      Electronic Records

      Pages 1+

      $0.30/pg up to $200 (requires EMR)

      Postage

      Actual cost of mailing

State of Oklahoma (OK) Medical Record Fees

Oklahoma Legislature (Statute 76 Oklahoma Statute Section 19)

 

South Carolina Medical Record Fee Schedule

      Electronic Records

      Pages 1 - 30

      $0.65 per page

      Pages 31+

      $0.50 per page

      Certification Fee

      $25.00

      Maximum Fee

      $150.00 per request

      Paper Records

      Pages 1 - 30

      $0.65 per page

      Pages 31+

      $0.50 per page

      Certification Fee

      $25.00

      Maximum Fee

      $200.00

State of South Carolina (SC) Medical Record Fees

South Carolina Code of Laws (Title 44-7-325)

 

Tennessee Medical Record Fee Schedule

      Clinics

      Pages 1 - 5

      $20.00 flat fee

      Pages 6+

      $0.50 per page

      Postage

      Actual cost of mailing

      Hospitals

      Pages 1 - 5

      $18.00 flat fee

      Pages 6 - 50

      $0.85 per page

      Pages 51 - 250

      $0.60 per page

      Postage

      Actual cost of mailing

      District Attorneys Only

      No charge for records

      Social Security

      Attorneys providing that the patient is applying for social security benefits and indigent may receive records free of charge.

State of Tennessee (TN) Medical Record Fees

Tennessee Code (Title 63 Chapter 2 Medical Records 63-2-102) and (Annotated 68-11-304)

 

Texas Medical Record Fee Schedule

      Hospitals

      Pages 1 - 10

      $45.74 flat fee

      Pages 11 - 60

      $1.54 per page

      Pages 61 - 400

      $0.76 per page

      Pages 401+

      $0.41 per page

      Postage

      Actual cost of mailing

      Microfilm

      Pages 1 - 10

      $69.67 flat fee

      Pages 11+

      $1.54

      Postage

      Actual cost of mailing

      If records are stored on digital or electronic platform

      Search Fee

      $82.87

      Postage

      Actual cost of mailing

State of Texas (TX) Medical Record Fees

Texas Health & Safety Code (§241.154)

 

Virginia Medical Record Fee Schedule

      Search Fee

      $10.00

      Pages 1 - 50

      $0.50 per page

      Pages 51+

      $0.25 per page

      Microfilm and other media

      $1.00 per page

State of Virginia (VA) Medical Record Fees

Code of Virginia (8.01-413)

 

West Virginia Medical Record Fee Schedule

      Labor

      $25 per hour, plus cost of materials and supplies

      Page 1

      $0.84

      Pages 2+

      $0.55 per page

 

      Worker's Comp:

      No fees are charged.

State of West Virginia (WV) Medical Record Fees

West Virginia Code (§16-29-2(a))

 

 

 

 

OTHER REGIONS

 

WESTERN

MIDWEST

NORTHEAST

 

 

 

Alaska (AK)

Illinois (IL)     

Connecticut (CT)

Arizona (AZ)

Indiana (IN)

Maine (ME)

California (CA)

Iowa (IA)

Massachusetts (MA)

Colorado (CO)

Kansas (KS)

New Hampshire (NH)

Hawaii (HI)

Michigan (MI)

New Jersey (NJ)

Idaho (ID)

Minnesota (MN)

New York (NY)

Montana (MT)

Missouri (MO)

Pennsylvania (PA)

Nevada (NV)

Nebraska (NE)

Rhode Island (RI)

New Mexico (NM)

North Dakota (ND)

Vermont (VT)

Oregon (OR)

Ohio (OH)

Utah (UT)

South Dakota (SD)

Washington (WA)

Wisconsin (WI) 

Wyoming (WY)

 

 

 

STATE-BY-STATE GUIDE OF MEDICAL RECORD COPYING FEES - NORTHEAST

THE NORTHEAST REGION

 

REGIONAL HEALTHCARE INFORMATION NEWS: The Connecticut Health Information Management Association (CHIMA) will be participating in the annual Leadership Symposium and Hill Day for the first time in several years. They are looking forward to discussing a variety of topics that will be presented on. Presentations include social media, advocacy, leading privacy in a new world, leading health through applied informatics, advocating on behalf of the consumer, MyHealthID, and Telehealth. MyHealthID in particular has been a topic of national discussion as of late. It was launched on March 20th and asks the White House to remove the budget ban preventing the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services from finding a patient identification solution. This solution would address the risk of incorrect patient matching as a result of the increased use of electronic health records. More information can be found on MyHealthId here.

 

Connecticut

      Pages 1+

      $0.65 per page

      Postage

      Actual cost of mailing

      Social Security

      No charge if the request is proven to support a claim under the Social Security Act. Proper documentation must be submitted with the request.

State of Connecticut (CT) Medical Record Fees

Connecticut General Assembly (General Statute 19a-490b)

 

Maine

      Paper Records

      Page 1

      $5.00

      Pages 2+

      $0.45 per page

      Maximum Fee

      $250.00 per request

      Electronic Records

      A reasonable fee may be charged.

      Maximum Fee

      $150.00 per request

State of Maine (ME) Medical Record Fees

Maine Revised Statutes (Title 22 Part 4 Chapter 401 Section 1711-A)

 

Massachusetts

      Search Fee

      $22.32

      Pages 1 - 100

      $0.76 per page

      Pages 100+

      $0.39 per page

      X-rays and other media

      Actual cost of reproduction

      Social Security

      No charge for a request to support a claim under the social security act. Must be specified in the request letter.

State of Massachusetts (MA) Medical Record Fees

The 189th General Court of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts (Title XVI, Ch III, Section 70)

 

New Hampshire

      Pages 1 - 30

      $15 flat fee or $0.50 per page, depending on which is greater

      X-rays and other media

      Reasonable fees may be charged.

State of New Hampshire (NH) Medical Record Fees

New Hampshire Revised Statutes Annotated Index (Title XXX Occupations and Professions Chapter 332-I Medical Records)

 

New Jersey

      Hospitals

      Search Fee

      $10.00

      Pages 1 - 100

      $1.00 per page

      Pages 101+

      $0.25 per page

      Maximum Fee

      $200.00

      Clinic

      Search Fee

      $10.00

      Pages 1+

      $1.00 per page

      Maximum Fee

      $100.00

      Attorneys that DO NOT represent the patient

      Search Fee

      $10.00

      Pages 1+

      $1.00 per page

      Postage

      15% of record copying costs

      Certification Fee

      $10.00

State of New Jersey (NJ) Medical Record Fees

State of New Jersey 215th Legislature (P.L. 1971, c.136 (C.26:2H-1))

 

New York

      Pages 1+

      $0.75 per page

      X-rays and other media

      Actual cost of reproduction

State of New York (NY) Medical Record Fees

New York State Department of Health (Statute Sections 17 & 18 of Public Health Law (PHL))

 

Pennsylvania

      Search Fee

      $21.69

      Pages 1 - 20

      $1.46 per page

      Pages 21 - 60

      $1.08 per page

      Pages 61+

      $0.36 per page

      Microfilm

      $2.16 per page

      Postage

      Actual cost of mailing

      District Attorney

      $21.69 Flat Fee Only

State of Pennsylvania (PA) Medical Record Fees

Pennsylvania Department of Health (44 Pa.B. 7617)

 

Rhode Island

      Paper Records

      Pages 1 - 50

      $0.75 per page

      Pages 51+

      $0.50 per page

      Electronic Records:

      Pages 1+

      $0.10 per page

      Maximum Fee

      $25.00

      Rush Fee

      $20.00 (only if request is fulfilled and records are delivered within 48 hours)

      X-rays and other media

      Reasonable costs not to exceed $25.00

State of Rhode Island (RI) Medical Record Fees

State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations Department of Health (R5-37- MD/DO Section 11.2)

 

Vermont

      Page 1+

      $5 flat fee or up to $0.50 per page, whichever is greater

      Social Security

      No charge for any request made under the provision of the Secure Security Act.

State of Vermont (VT) Medical Record Fees

Vermont State Codes and Statutes (Title 18 Chapter 221 Section 9419)

 

 

OTHER REGIONS:

 

MIDWEST

WESTERN

SOUTH

 

 

Medical Record Fees By State and Statute:

Illinois (IL)     

Alaska (AK)

Alabama (AL)

Indiana (IN)

Arizona (AZ)

Arkansas (AR)

Iowa (IA)

California (CA)

Delaware (DE)

Kansas (KS)

Colorado (CO)

District of Columbia (DC)

Michigan (MI)

Hawaii (HI)

Florida (FL)

Minnesota (MN)

Idaho (ID)

Georgia (GA)

Missouri (MO)

Nebraska (NE)

Montana (MT)

Nevada (NV)

Kentucky (KY)

Louisiana (LA)

North Dakota (ND)

Ohio (OH)

New Mexico (NM)

Oregon (OR)

Maryland (MD)

Mississippi (MS)

South Dakota (SD)

Wisconsin (WI)

Utah (UT)

Washington (WA)

North Carolina (NC)

Oklahoma (OK)

Wyoming (WY)

South Carolina (SC)

Tennessee (TN)

Texas (TX)

Virginia (VA)

West Virginia (WV)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Are you Ready? Phase Two of HIPAA Audit Program Launched

On March 21, 2016, the HHS Office for Civil Rights (OCR) reported that Phase 2 of its HIPAA Privacy, Security, and Breach Notification Audit Program has begun. The HIPAA audit program is a result of the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (HITECH), which requires the OCR to periodically audit both covered entities and business associates in an effort to evaluate their HIPAA compliance.

 

Phase One of the audits, implemented in 2011 and 2012, assessed covered entities. The OCR used this stage to gather information on the auditing process, such as what improvements they could make in their technical support, and to assess the efficacy of different corrective actions insofar as their ability to improve compliance. Last year, the OCR released a compliance report entailing the timeline of the audits, the selection process, and a breakdown of the audit testing procedure. Utilizing the experiences and results from the first phase, Phase Two will analyze the compliance of covered entities as well as business associates.

 

The OCR has already begun sending questionnaires to potential auditees regarding their size, the type of the potential subject, and their operations, as well as verifying their contact information. They will use the information from the questionnaires to select a diverse cross-section of candidates. It’s important to note that any covered entity or business associate can be chosen, even if they do not respond to the OCRs pre-audit questionnaire. However, covered associates or business associates who are involved in a current OCR investigation or review will not be selected during Phase Two.

 

Phase Two will involve both desk audit and on-site audits. Both will assess the compliance of subjects with the HIPAA Privacy, Security, and Breach Notification Rules. In the case of a desk audit, once a subject has begun the auditing process, they have 10 business days to supply any requested documentation. The documentation will be audited and findings will be drafted and given back to the subject of the audit, who will have another 10 days to respond to the audit if they so choose.

 

On-site audits entail a slightly different process. Auditors will schedule an appointment with the subject and provide them with details about the auditing process. The audit typically lasts three to five days. After the findings are given back to the subject, the auditee will have 10 days to review the audit and respond to it with their comments. Both desk and on-site audits will be completed by the end of December 2016.

 

After the audits are completed, OCR will aggregate the results in an effort to better understand compliance techniques, and to develop tools that will aid industry leaders in preventing breaches and in completing compliance self-evaluations. OCR intends for the audits to lead to more beneficial future practices and to expose the reasons behind security breaches. However, in the event that serious compliance issues are indicated in an individual audit, a compliance review may be initiated. 

Let ChartRequest help you navigate and manage the disclosure components of the audit with a full accounting of disclosures of all medical records through one centralized platform. Get complaint and be prepared for OCR Audits today with assistance from ChartRequest!

Three Questions To Ask When Taking On A Release of Information Partner

Finding the Right Disclosure Management + Release of Information Partner

If you are one of the many healthcare organizations making the decision to outsource your Release of Information/Disclosure Management process there are many important factors to consider looking for the right company to handle your business needs. 

Questions to Consider When Choosing a PHI Disclosure Management Partner

Do you provide remote, on-site, or hybrid services?
Remote services are more beneficial for smaller companies with limited space. Your company should ensure all records are scanned into the EHR system in order for the outsourced records company to effectively process and release records.  This should include all billing, X Ray/films, along with any archive records would need to be pulled from storage and scanned onto the EHR platform. If scanning is not an option, you should make sure the vendor has web-based disclosure management software that enables you to simply upload the records securely for transmittal.       

How much information do you feel comfortable with handing over to the health record company?
When asking this question one must also take into account the size and sensitivity of PHI being stored.  Do you want the outsourcing company handling all your records? Or maybe keep the highly sensitive materials, such as court orders and patient requests, in-house while allowing your PHI disclosure management firm to handle all other requests. Make sure the firm understands the types of requests that you receive so that they can best service your account.

How to ensure your vendor and employees are all meeting HIPAA privacy and security requirements? 
One major concern when outsourcing records are the potential unknowns for security breaches.  More hands handling the record can be disastrous, especially if these are untrained professionals.  It is imperative to ensure proper HIPAA training and certification processes are in-place so your company can avoid these all-to-common issues. 

Every step and detail of process matters when releasing medical records, avoidable errors must be eliminated at all costs.  The consequences for dosing errors, failure to detect serious illnesses, and delays in treatment due to poor human-computer interactions or loss of data are often times irreversible and inexcusable.

Learn more about ChartRequest - the most modern SaaS-based Disclosure Management platform for Releasing Medical Records Securely.

Schedule a demo with ChartRequest now to learn more!

 

HIPAA and Accounting of disclosures of PHI

According to HIPPA (§164.528 - Accounting of disclosures of protected health information; source: http://www.hipaasurvivalguide.com/hipaa-regulations/164-528.php), “An individual has a right to receive an accounting of disclosures of protected health information made by a covered entity in the six years prior to the date on which the accounting is requested.” In other words, a patient can request information about when, and why, and to whom their PHI has been released. According to the legislation, the information that must be tracked and made available includes: 

(1) The date of the disclosure

(2) The person or organization who received the information

(3) A description of what was released

(4) The purpose for the disclosure. 

The information must be made available to the patient no later than 60 days after their request is received.

How can you ensure that your practice is tracking medical record disclosures? Well, that’s where the ChartRequest platform comes into play. Our platform automatically creates an Account of Disclosure for every request entered into the system. Click the “Account of Disclosure” tab on your ChartRequest account to view a list of every request entered onto the ChartRequest platform in one convenient location.


From this list, the provider’s office can click on the request number to see all of the details regarding any given request.

Fax-based medical record release systems complicate this step for medical practices around the country. Medical records staff use work intensive, manual excel spreadsheets and paper files to keep track of outgoing records.  ChartRequest’s “Walk-In Request” function solves this problem even for fax-only requests, such as government ROI requests. A provider’s office can use the walk-in function when they receive a request from someone who cannot or will not submit the request via the platform on their own.  This can be from a patient who walks into the office, or a covered entity, who is not able to submit their request via the internet. When the request comes in, the office staff enters it into the platform in the same manner that any requestor does. Once the request has been entered, an Account of Disclosure will be created automatically. (Watch a ChartRequest Account Manager describe the walk-in process here)

There are many things that go into being HIPAA compliant. This is just another step that we’ve taken to help you manage your risk. If you have any questions regarding our “Account of Disclosure” or “Walk-in Request” features, feel free to reach out to us for more information.

How to facilitate online record requests

According to the Optum Institute/Harris Interactive National Survey, “Three out of four consumers are willing to go online to view their medical records” (September 2012, Optum Institute/Harris Interactive National Survey). Unfortunately, it can often feel like your patient body was miraculously drawn from the ¼ of the population unwilling to access medical information online. Here are a few reasons requestors may want to consider using ChartRequest to request medical records online:

 

1. ChartRequest is more secure than mail or fax.

Usernames and passwords on online accounts ensure that private medical information is kept private. ChartRequest’s secure log in process ensures that only designated users have access to private health information. Unlike records sent to a fax machine, which several people may have access to at any given time, requestors can rest assured that only the people they want to have access to their records, will obtain access.

2. Electronic release is faster

Providers, patients, and other requestors can have access to records within minutes with just one click of the mouse. No need to wait for fax or snail mail delivery. Requestors can instantly log in to download records once the request has been fulfilled. This option also enables you to save a copy of the items requested for your own personal records.

3. Electronic release is more convenient

Thanks to ChartRequest, patients don’t even need to leave the house to have access to records. ChartRequest’s quick and secure .pdf download option ensures that records are delivered right to requestors via cloud-technology.

 

Our product team has included features to make it easier to recruit patients to the online request form. First, ask your account administrator to enable walk-in requests. Walk-in requests allow front desk staff to document all necessary identifiers and an authorization from a patient visiting the practice. ChartRequest will automatically track and invoice the request to make sure your practice stays in compliance and processes any necessary fees. 

Second, ChartRequest allows you to invite requestors directly to your platform. You can start a request for a requestor right on your request page. Check out our video library below for step by step explanaitions of both the requestor invitation and walk-in requests. 

 

These convincing qualities and ChartRequest’s features should help requestors adapt to electronic medical records requests in no time. If you have any best practices your practice devised, please share them with us in the comment section.

What You Need To Know About Medical Records Retention

Every physician’s dream is to be able to help even more patients every day. However, as your practice gains more patients, your medical records collection grows larger and takes up more space. Physicians are required by federal law to retain records for any and all patients who have ever received care at your practice. State laws further define which records need to be retained, as well as the minimum retention period for the various types of records.

Why Retain Medical Records?

Medical records contain information regarding a patient’s health and treatment history. Physicians need to have access to previous records so they can provide the best possible treatment to the patient. Thus, practices need to retain medical records in the case of future requests for copies.  Furthermore, medical records provide support for the physician’s defense in malpractice suits.

Which Records Should You Retain?

It is recommended the physician  retains any record that deals with patient care. Thus, all examinations, medication, treatments, and physician notes should be kept during the retention period. Furthermore, any requested records regarding the patient must also be retained. If you used any of these records as the basis of treatment for the patient, it is vital for these records to also be kept, especially in case of a malpractice suit.

What Federal Laws Affect Medical Records Retention?

If your patient is covered by Medicare, you need to hold their records for a minimum of five years. However, HIPAA requires that records must be held for six years.

What Other Laws Affect Medical Records Retention?

Every state has laws and statutes regarding medical records retention that are specific to that state. These laws go more in depth regarding the length of the retention period and the various types of records that should be retained.  Our platform is specific to each state with regard to pricing rules.  There are differences beyond pricing, however, including retention statutes.  Here’s a spotlight on a few states with vastly different retention requirements:

Retention Laws in Massachusetts

In Massachusetts, a patient’s medical records must be held for at least twenty years after discharge from hospitals, regardless of whether the patient is an adult or a minor. Mental health records must be held for a minimum of thirty years. Additionally, patient X-Ray records, which are filed separately, need to be held for ten years.[1] At private practices, an adult patient’s medical records must be held for at least seven years. Similarly, a minor patient’s medical records must be held for at least seven years or until the minor reaches the age of nine, whichever is longer.[2]

Retention Laws in New Jersey

In New Jersey, a patient’s medical records must be held for a minimum of ten years following their discharge from the hospital. If the patient is the minor, the records must be held for either ten years or until the patient turns twenty three years old, whichever is longer. However, all hospital summary sheets must be held for a minimum of twenty years. Private practices, on the other hand, need to retain medical records for at least seven years for both adults and minors.[3]

Retention Laws in New York

In New York, patient care reports from hospitals, along with other files including treatment and billing information must be kept for a minimum of six years after patient discharge, as per HIPAA requirements. However, in the case of minors, records need to be kept for either six years or for three years after their eighteenth birthday, depending on which period is longer.  Ambulance run logs must be kept for six years after the last entry in the log. All summary files regarding patient care and ambulance runs must be retained for at least three years.[4] Also, medical records need to be retained six years after the patient’s death.

At private practices, records must be kept a minimum of six years for adult patients after they have last been treated at that practice. Similarly, records must be kept for six years or until the minor turns nineteen years old, whichever is longer. The listed retention periods are the minimum required length, and it is encouraged for providers to keep the records for a longer period of time, if possible.

As you can see, medical record retention laws are different for each state. Some states might have similar laws, while others might not. Furthermore, the retention laws for private practices and hospitals are also different, so it is important for you to know the correct retention laws for your practice type. If you do not know the medical records retention laws for your state, it would be best for you to familiarize yourself and your staff on their contents. State laws regarding medical records retention laws can be found on your state’s Office of Health website.

Have feedback on this post, or any other information on medical records retention laws to share?  Comment below and we will be happy to include it in future blog posts!

[1]http://www.sec.state.ma.us/arc/arcpdf/0211.pdf

[2]http://www.healthit.gov/sites/default/files/appa7-1.pdf

[3]http://www.state.nj.us/oag/ca/bme/faq/physFAQ.htm#10

[4]http://www.health.ny.gov/professionals/ems/policy/08-03.htm

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